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Monday, March 27, 2017

Edward Marshall Boehm American Figurative Expressionsit Porcelain Sculptor of the 1950s.


According to Marilyn Stokstad, the art historian:
"Expressionism (is) the manipulation of formal or representational elements to convey intense feelings."

Edward Marshall Boehm explained his choice of porcelain as the medium for his art as follows:                               
"Porcelain is a permanent creation. If properly processed and fired, its colors will never change; and it can be subjected to extreme temperatures without damage. It is a medium in which one can portray the everlasting beauty of form and color of wildlife and nature."

Frank J. Cosentino commented on the art of Edward Marshall Boehm: 
"Its grandeur is in its perfection. It is a disciplined art, mastering the demands of the ancient and distinguished craft of porcelain making."

Edward Marshall Boehm was a pioneer American figurative expressionist porcelain sculptor. He created porcelain sculptures between 1950 until his death in 1969 in Trenton, New Jersey. During his lifetime the introduction and closing dates of his limited edition sculptures were well documented.


After the death of his wife Helen who functioned as his manager the Studio has changed ownership several times. Today the name Boehm is being used to create porcelain in the manner of Edward Marshall Boehm by The Boehm Porcelain Company of Trenton, NJ, reopened  August 15, 2016. It is using the name "Boehm" along with a modified hallmark of Edward Marshall Boehm. 


The exceptional sculptures of Edward Marshall Beohm as an American figurative expressionist porcelain sculptor of the 1950s remains unequaled.



Edward Marshall Boehm, Percheron Mare and Foal on base, 1950 glazed, decorated Black Foal-possibly unique glazed, decorated Dapple Gray Foal-2 made9 1/2 x 14 inches. This is the first piece of sculpture ever modeled by Edward Marshall Boehm. 




Edward Marshall Boehm, Hereford Bull, on base with presentation plaque,
1950-1959 

10 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, glazed, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark Number 301.

Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. 




Edward Marshall Boehm, Percheron Stallion, Dapple Gray with Roses
with blue finish, 1951-1959

12 x 91/4 inches, glazed, decoratedBoehm Studiomark Number 201.
Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.




Edward Marshall Boehm, Canvasback Ducks, on Cattails (pr.), 1951-1958
4 inches, glazed, decorated found with makers mark D
Decorated bisque has been found with makers mark F

Boehm Studiomark Number 401



Edward Marshall Boehm, Song Sparrows With Tulips, (pr.) 1956-1960
17 x 9 inches, bisque, decorated.

Boehm Studiomark number 421.




Edward Marshall Boehm, Goldfinches, 1961-1966
11 1/2 x 5 inches, bisque, decorated
Boehm Studiomark number 457




Edward Marshall Boehm, Sugarbirds, 1961-1966

25 1/2 x 11 inches, bisque, decorated
Boehm Studiomark number 460



Edward Marshall Boehm, Robin with Daffodil, 1964-1966
13 x 8 inches, bisque, decorated.

Boehm Studiomark Number: 472
Presented to Queen Elizabeth II of England

Presented to Pope Paul VI by President Nixon




Edward Marshall Boehm, Ivory-Billed Woodpeckers, 1964-1966
Hight: 54 inches, bisque, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark Number 480

Edward Marshall Boehm, Parula Warblers, 1965-1973
14 1/2 x 9 x 7 3/4 inches, 
bisque, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark Number: 484


Edward Marshall Boehm, Crested Flycatcher on Sweet Gum, 1967-1974
18 1/2 x 14 x 11 inches, 
bisque, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark number 488




Edward Marshall Boehm, Hooded Mergansers, (pr.) 1968
Female: 10 1/2 x 6 3/4 x 7 inches
Male: 10 1/2 x 11 x 12 inches, 
bisque, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark number 496



Edward Marshall Boehm, Common Tern, 1968-1974
16 x 12 x 14 inches, bisque, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark number 497




Edward Marshall Boehm, Young American Bald Eagle, 1969-1974
9 1/2 x 6 inches, bisque, decorated. 
It was designed for the incoming President.
Boehm Studiomark number 498


Edward Marshall Boehm, Western Bluebird with Wild Azaleas, 1969
17 1/2 x 20 x 10 inches, bisque, decorated.
Boehm Studiomark number 400-01

Please view:Edward Marshall Boehm American Expressionist in Porcelain Sculpture  

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Sunday, October 9, 2016

New York School Press the Source of Very Fine Art Books

New York School Press
is the
Source of Very Fine Art Books
The best seller Art Books ​Found in the better Book Store  
  


                    
                                                 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                


Thursday, July 28, 2016

Great Art of a Great Modern Era

Long Island Books: "New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artist's Choice by Artists"

Rose C.S. Slivka | December 14, 2000

"New York School Abstract
Expressionists: Artist's Choice by Artists"

Edited by Marika Herskovic
New York School Press, $95
Marika Herskovic, the editor and driving force behind the book "New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artist's Choice by Artists," may well have hauled in the most complete roundup of the many and varied painters and sculptors who created and defined the most adventurously American art movement of the 20th century.
This lavish book presents 265 artists in 393 pages, with no less than 172 full-page reproductions and statements by 86 artists.
The New York School movement was undoubtedly the most significant in the history of American art. Taking place in downtown New York where artists worked in neighboring studios during the post World War II boom, Abstract Expressionism received visibility in artist-organized exhibits beginning with the "9th Street Show" in 1951 and continuing uptown with the annual Stable Gallery shows until 1957.
The New York School was inhabited by a variety of yet-to-be-known makers and individual styles, yet all shared the brave new art world of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Mark Rothko.
The book documents not only those who made it and became world famous, but the many about whom, still, little is known. Yet they participated richly with their energy, work, and ideas in this tumultuous, generative period. The book represents them vividly, thereby ensuring that they will not be lost.
What most defined the time was its high camaraderie, a group spirit in downtown New York that had its genesis in the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression, when artists worked on government sponsored projects and murals in public spaces. The movement reached its peak in the late 1940s and early 1950s and has not been equaled since.


Ibram Lassaw Erinnys, 1954
All right reserved by the artists or by his delegates.
                                                 
How Old?
Published by the New York School Press, the book has been luxuriously printed on heavy coated stock. It contains installation shots of both the "9th Street Show," which took place in a rented loft, and the Stable Gallery on West 57th Street, together with replicas of announcements and lists of artists. The lists give ages and the numbers of times each artist showed as well as other statistical data and a complete index of artist participation in these events.
Having been around the scene at the time, I was amused to see that age is as prone to the manipulations of vanity among the men as legend would have it was among the women.
While many of the reproductions were supplied by the artists, their galleries, and collectors, an impressive number are photographs done for the book by Geoffrey Clements, who is treated as an artist in his own right, with a full-page photograph of himself and two pages of text.
This is on a par with the work of the incomparable Aaron Siskind, the photographer-collagist who influenced the painting of his time, particularly the work of Franz Kline. With two full-page reproductions, a statement from Siskind's own writings, plus a curriculum vitae including all his solo and group exhibits, the point of his importance is certainly made clear.
A member of the Artists Club, he was the only photographer whom the artists welcomed as a participant. Otherwise, the painters of that era considered photographers on a lower plane.
It comes as a fresh surprise to see how important the East End becomes as the place that harbored Action Painting, as Abstract Expressionism was also called by its foremost critic, Harold Rosenberg, who lived in New York and in Springs.
The list of those who lived and worked on the East End, many of whom still do, numbers 53.

All the books by Marika Herskovic/New York School Press are available at:

amazon.com


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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, American Abstract Expressionist

Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, American Abstract Expressionist

Joe Stefanelli (born 1921) also known as Joseph J. Stefanelli belonged to the New York School Abstract Expressionist artists whose influence and artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized around the world. New York School Abstract Expressionism, represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and others became a leading art movement of the post-World War II era.




video


Joe Stefanelli-Abstract Expressionist

New York School action painter.



Joe Stefanelli, Untitled, 1951
Oil on canvas,25 x 30 1/8 inches
Exhibited in the "9th St." Sho, 1951



Joe Stefanelli, Wednesday, 1958
Oil on canvas, 50 x 60 inches



Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, Whisper 1961
Oil on canvas 26 x 20 in



Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, Once more, 1962,
Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 23 inches



Joe Stefanelli, Tucon painting #4, 1985
Acrylic on board 24 x 30 inches



Joe Stefanelli, Mythra Dialogue, 1988. 
Acrylic on canvas, 39 3/4 x 50 1/8 inches  



Joe Stefanelli, Bologna Attendants, 1989
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 50 inches


Joe Stefanelli is represented in the book:

https://plus.google.com/+Newyorkschoolpresspub


Sunday, July 17, 2016

Abstract Expressionism and New York City




Abstract Expressionism marked the beginning of New York City’s influence as the center of the western art world. 
The world of the Abstract Expressionist artists was firmly rooted in Lower Manhattan.
A walk along 8th Street would take you from the Waldorf Cafeteria, where penniless artists made “tomato soup” from the free hot water and ketchup; 
past the Hans Hofmann School of Fine artists founded by the painter of the same name; 
to The Club, 
a loft where lectures and heated arguments about art carried on late into the night. 
Jackson Pollock’s studio was on East 8th Street, 
Willem de Kooning’s Philip Guston’s, Albert Kotin's and most other pioneer New York School artists' studios were on East 10th. 
Most nights the "down town artists" could be found at the Cedar Street Tavern on University Place.  
Although the term "abstract expressionism" was first applied to American art in 1946 by the art critic Robert Coates, 
it had been first used in Germany in 1919 in the magazine Der Sturm, regarding German Expressionism. 
Alfred Barr was the first to use this term in 1929 in relation to works by Wassily Kandinsky. 

Paintings by the artists of the 9th St Show

  Marika Herskovic/Virtual Gallery



Abstract Expressionism and New York City




Abstract Expressionism marked the beginning of New York City’s influence as the center of the western art world. 
The world of the Abstract Expressionist artists was firmly rooted in Lower Manhattan.
A walk along 8th Street would take you from the Waldorf Cafeteria, where penniless artists made “tomato soup” from the free hot water and ketchup; 
past the Hans Hofmann School of Fine artists founded by the painter of the same name; 
to The Club, 
a loft where lectures and heated arguments about art carried on late into the night. 
Jackson Pollock’s studio was on East 8th Street, 
Willem de Kooning’s Philip Guston’s, Albert Kotin's and most other pioneer New York School artists' studios were on East 10th. 
Most nights the "down town artists" could be found at the Cedar Street Tavern on University Place.  
Although the term "abstract expressionism" was first applied to American art in 1946 by the art critic Robert Coates, 
it had been first used in Germany in 1919 in the magazine Der Sturm, regarding German Expressionism. 
Alfred Barr was the first to use this term in 1929 in relation to works by Wassily Kandinsky. 

Paintings by the artists of the 9th St Show

  Virtual Gallery